Trend: This Is How Women Are Standing Up Against Low Wages

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It’s no secret that more and more women are staking their claim in the work world. Although women make up a large portion of the workforce, a disproportionate number of them are low-wage workers and problems with fair working conditions persist.

Things like wage theft, the absence of a work/ life balance, unfair schedules and more plague women working in low-wage professions.

But increasingly, these female dominated industries are fighting back, organizing and creating change.

NFL cheerleaders

For the past 8 months, cheerleaders from three NFL teams have begun to speak out against unfair treatment both on and off the field. Grievances ranged from low wages, to wage theft to outright demeaning requests.

Despite the poor working conditions, there have been some glimmers of hope in the form of worker-led organization. Back in May a former dancer called for the unionization of the cheerleaders as a possible remedy to the low wages and unfair conditions that plague the work, and since then the Oakland Raiders have made the decision to finally pay dancers the minimum wage in addition to paying them for work-related events.

Hotel workers

The most dangerous job in the service industry is that of a hotel housekeeper, a role primarily held by women workers.  Many of these workers endure unrealistic work expectations and low pay.

Back in 2013, a group of Albuquerque hotel workers approached the New Mexico arm of Working America because they felt that they weren’t being fairly compensated for cleaning rooms. At the time the workers claimed that they were being paid $3.25 per room, instead of the city-wide minimum wage of $8.50.

The DOL then launched a formal investigation and found that the hotel was indeed paying workers below both the city and Federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour.

That investigation has prompted fairer wages and policies for workers.

Domestic workers

Women represent 95% of domestic workers, which comprises child and homecare jobs, but across the nation 23% of these workers are paid less than the state minimum wage.

What’s more, it seems that many in-home child care workers aren’t given breaks and are forced to work long, strenuous hours.

But recent victories in California, Massachusetts and New York point to greater rights for this group of workers.

Most recently, a Domestic Workers Bill of Rights was passed in Massachusetts. The bill gives workers proper breaks, unpaid sick days, and clarifies working hours. Similar bills have been passed in California and New York.

Photo courtesy of Herald Post via Flickr.

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