Economy Adds 257,000 Jobs in January

The economy added 257,000 jobs in January and the unemployment rate ticked slightly up to 5.7% from December’s 5.6%, according to figures released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was unchanged from December at 2.8 million, but the median duration of unemployment went up, because of a rise in the share of workers unemployed more than 15 weeks. So, those who have returned to the labor market still find it hard to find work.

AFL-CIO Chief Economist William E.  Spriggs said 2014 was the best year for job growth since the 1990s, and America is experiencing a record number of consecutive months of private-sector job growth. But he added:

In 2014, workers’ wages barely outpaced inflation, increasing only 2.1%. In fact, throughout the recent economic expansion, workers’ wages have stayed the same. If you adjust for inflation, median weekly wages for full-time workers are stuck where they were in 2011.That’s a big problem, because those are workers in their prime who are holding steady jobs.

Last month’s biggest job gains were in retail trades (46,000), construction (39,000), health care (38,000), food services (35,000), professional and technical (33,000), financial activities (26,000) and manufacturing (22,000).

Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging, warehousing, transportation, information and government, showed little change over the month.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates in January for teenagers increased to 18.8% from 16.8%. The jobless rate for adult women (5.1%), adult men (5.3%), blacks (10.3%), Latinos (6.7%) and whites (4.9%) showed little change in January from December.

Reposted from AFL-CIO NOW

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With 252,000 New Jobs, December Unemployment Drops to 5.6%

The economy added 252,000 jobs in December and the unemployment rate dropped to 5.6% from November’s 5.8%, according to figures released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Over the year, the unemployment rate has dropped by 1.1 percentage points and the number of jobless workers has decreased by 1.7 million.

Job growth in 2014—2.95 million new jobs—was the best since 1999. But as speakers at this week’s AFL-CIO National Summit on Raising Wages pointed out, even with better job growth this year, wages remain stagnant. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez outlined the defining economic fact of the past generation: productivity has gone way up and wages have stayed flat. (Read more about the summit here and here.)

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was unchanged from November at 2.8 million, and over the past 12 months, the number of long-term jobless workers has decreased by 1.1 million.

Last month’s biggest job gains were in professional and business services (52,000), construction (48,000), food services (44,000), health care (34,000) and manufacturing (17,000).

Other sectors that showed increases included financial activities (20,000), construction (20,000) and transportation and warehousing (17,000). Employment in wholesale trade and financial activities showed slight gains.

Employment in other major industries, including retail trade, mining and logging, information, warehousing and government, showed little change over the month.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates in November for adult women (5%) decreased from November’s 5.2%. The rates for men (5.3%), teenagers (16.8%), blacks (10.4%), Latinos (6.5%) and whites (4.8%) showed little change in December.

Reposted from AFL-CIO NOW

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Jobless Rate Dips to 5.8% with 214 New Jobs Added in October

The economy added 214,000 jobs in October, down from September’s 248,000 new jobs, but the unemployment rate fell to 5.8% compared to last month’s 5.9%, according to figures released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Since the beginning of 2014, the unemployment rate has dropped by .8 percentage points and the number of jobless workers has decreased by 1.2 million.

While jobs are being created—about 200,000 a month for the past year—wages remain stagnant, with the median family income in the United States falling back to 1995 levels. Alliance for American Manufacturing President Scott Paul said:

The good news is that manufacturing jobs have grown over the past few months. The bad news is that they haven’t grown fast enough. I’m very concerned that a surge of imports from China and a paucity of public investment in infrastructure will continue to hamper the great potential of the productive sector of our economy….No doubt the economic anxiety that many Americans still feel is compounded by stagnant wage growth and diminished opportunities for middle-class careers.

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was 2.9 million, slightly down from September’s 3 million. Over the past 12 months, the number of long-term jobless workers has decreased by 1.1 million.

Last month’s biggest job gains were in food services (42,000), professional and business services (37,000), retail trades (27,000) and health care (25,000).

Other sectors that showed increases include manufacturing (15,000), transportation and warehousing (13,000) and construction (12,000).

Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging, wholesale trade, information, financial activities and government, showed little change over the month.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates in September declined for whites (4.8%) last month. The rates for adult men (5.1%), adult women (5.4%), teenagers (18.6%), blacks (10.9%) and Latinos (6.8%) showed little change in October.

Reposted from AFL-CIO NOW

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248,000 New Jobs Drop Jobless Rate to 5.9% in September

The economy added 248,000 new jobs in September, a big increase over the 180,000 jobs added in August. The unemployment rate fell to 5.9% compared to 6.1% in August, according to figures released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Over the past year, the unemployment rate has dropped by 1.3 percentage points and the number of jobless workers has decreased by 1.9 million.

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was 3 million, unchanged from August. Over the past 12 months, the number of long-term jobless workers has decreased by 1.2 million.

AFL-CIO Policy Director and Special Counsel Damon Silvers said while the drop in the jobless rate is encouraging, wages continue to stagnate.

For the economy to work for everyone, we need to see low unemployment rates coupled with wages that are rising, like we saw in the late 1990s, when real wages rose and the jobless rate dropped as low as 4%.

While long-term joblessness has dropped some, it remains a major problem. House Republicans have, since the end of last year, refused to allow a vote on the extension of the Emergency Unemployment Compensation benefits program that was approved by a bipartisan Senate majority. Now, Congress is out of session until after the election, and even then House Republicans are likely to turn their backs on long-term jobless workers again.

Last month’s biggest job gains were in professional and business services (81,000), retail trade (35,000) and health care (23,000).

Other sectors that showed increases include leisure and hospitality (21,000), construction (16,000), information (12,000), financial (12,000) and mining (9,000).

Employment in other major industries, including manufacturing, wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing and government, showed little change in September.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates in September declined for adult men (5.3%), whites (5.1%) and Latinos (6.9%). The rates for adult women (5.7%), teenagers (20%) and blacks (11%) showed little change.

Reposted from AFL-CIO NOW

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Jobless Rate Dips to 7.2% with Disappointing 148,000 New Jobs in September

The nation’s economy added 148,000 new jobs in September, compared to 169,000 jobs created in August. The 7.2% jobless rate is slightly down from August’s 7.3%, according to figures released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

While today’s report reflects 42 straight months of job growth, the pace is weak, sluggish and just enough to absorb new entrants into the market and makes little dent in the jobs deficit.

Job creation is likely to slow even more after the 16-day House Republican government shutdown and their irresponsible vow to hold the raising of the nation’s debt ceiling hostage over Republicans’ demands to weaken the Affordable Care Act and for significant cuts in vital safety net programs.

With the shutdown over and budget talks set to get under way, working families are calling for the creation of jobs and raising hundreds of billions of dollars to invest in our future by ending all tax subsidies for outsourcing; repeal of the job-killing sequester; rejection of any benefit cuts to Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid and protection of food aid for the poor.

The number of long-term unemployed people (those who are jobless for 27 weeks or more) dropped slightly from 4.3 million to 4.1 million, accounting for 36.9% of the people without jobs. The number of long-term jobless people has dropped by 725,000 over the past 12 months.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (7.1%), adult women (6.2%) teenagers (21.4%), whites (6.3%), African Americans (12.9%) and Latinos (9%) showed little change in September.

The biggest job gains were in professional and business services (32,000), transportation and warehousing (23,000), construction (20,000), wholesale (15,000) and retail (9,000).

Employment in other major industries, including leisure and hospitality, health care, mining and logging, manufacturing, information and government, showed little change in September.

Reposted from AFL-CIO NOW

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Working America Statement on November Jobs Report

Any time our economy adds jobs, it’s a good thing, and the decline in the unemployment rate is a step in the right direction. But we’re still not adding jobs at the rate we need to recover from the devastating recession, and our elected officials need to focus all of their energy on putting America back to work.  Our 3 million Working America members are paying attention to what goes on in Congress and in state legislatures.  At our conversations at the doors every night, we still hear that job creation is the number one issue for our members and their families.

Despite the addition of 120,000 net jobs, thousands of people are discouraged from entering the work force. A minority in the Senate has repeatedly blocked bills that would inject much-needed money into our economy and put hundreds of thousands of people back to work—all in the name of protecting historically low tax rates for the very wealthy. At the same time, in less than a month, unemployment insurance is set to expire for millions of jobless workers.

At the state level, the picture looks similarly bleak for working families.  Short-sighted budget cuts have put thousands of public servants like teachers, nurses and firefighters out of work, depriving our communities of much-needed services. That needs to change.

Working America members have a message for their elected officials: end the delays and immediately pass extensions of job-creating tax relief and unemployment insurance for the millions without jobs. Today’s job numbers are positive, but they show how far we have to go to get our economy working again for everyone.

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Jobless Rate Drops to 8.6%, Economy Adds 120,000 Jobs

by Mike Hall – Reposted from the AFL-CIO NOW Blog

The nation’s unemployment rate in November fell to 8.6 percent down from October’s 9 percent and the lowest since March 2009. The economy added 120,000 jobs last month, according to the latest figures released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Economists say the nation needs 130,000-150,000 new jobs each month to keep up with the growth of the workforce, and the large drop in the unemployment rate also is the result of some 315,000 workers dropping out of the labor force. The jobless rate counts only people who are actively looking for work.

Economic Policy Institute (EPI) economist Heidi Shierholz says:

At this pace of job growth, it will be more than two decades before we get back down to the pre-recession unemployment rate. Moreover, a shrinking labor force is not the way we want to see unemployment drop. At this rate of growth we are looking at a long, long schlep before our sick labor market recovers.

More than 13 million workers remain unemployed, but some 26 million Americans are unemployed, underemployed or have stopped looking for work. The number of long-term jobless (more than 27 weeks) was 5.7 million, or 43 percent of the total jobless.

Unemployment Insurance (UI) coverage for the long-term unemployed is set to expire Dec. 31 and nearly 2 million out-of-work Americans will be cut off from federal UI coverage the first week of January alone, unless Congress renews the program. More than 6 million workers could potentially lose their critically needed UI coverage over the course of 2012.

Wednesday, some 200 jobless workers rallied on Capitol Hill and delivered 75,000 petitions urging Congress act now to extend unemployment insurance coverage. The rally kicked off week-long series of actions to demand Congress act and will culminate with a Dec. 8 Capitol Hill rally of jobless workers, union members and community and faith activists.

Today’s figures show that unemployment rate for adult men fell by 0.5 percentage point to 8.3 percent in November. The jobless rate for whites declined from 8 to 7.6 percent while the jobless rate for African Americans rose to 15.5 percent from 15.1 percent in October. The rates for adult women (7.8 percent), teenagers (23.7 percent) and Hispanics (11.4 percent) showed little or no change.

Image from troubalex on Flickr, via Creative Commons

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Employment Falls, Private Job Growth Weak

Mixed numbers in the June jobs report could make for some confusing analysis in pundit-land today. So, let’s take a clear look at the reported statistics before we discuss their import.

Total non-farm employment declined by 125,000 in June, reflecting the impact of a decrease of 225,000 in the number of temporary federal Census workers. Private sector employment increased by 83,000 — somewhat less than most economists reportedly expected. One-fourth of the increase in private jobs were in temporary services.

The official unemployment rate decreased to 9.5% from 9.7%, but as we will see that was due to a reported decline of 652,000 in the civilian labor force and a drop of 0.3% in the labor force participation rate.

The number of long-term unemployed, those out of work for six months or more, remained at a post-Depression record level, unchanged at 6.8 million, while the average duration of unemployment continued its persistent rise to 35.2 weeks.

Taking the suggestion of Calculated Risk, if we eliminate the Census employment number (-225,000) from the total employment change statistic (-125,000), we see a net ex-Census gain of 100,000 jobs. That is about what’s normally needed just to keep pace with population-related labor force growth. It certainly does not even begin to chip away at the 11 million jobs deficit that the U.S. economy faces.

And, as the numbers show, the job market is not growing fast enough even to offset the declines in public sector employment.

Here are two views of comparative job losses in U.S. recessions, the first with job losses charted from the start of the recessions.

JuneJobs_CalcRisk2
click for larger version at Calculated Risk

The second with job losses aligned for maximum job loss, at the bottom of the recessions.

JuneJobs_CalcRisk
click for larger version at Calculated Risk

Which brings us back to that new 9.5% unemployment rate, down from 9.7% in May. That’s the number that those who wish to put on rose-colored glasses to read this jobs report will want to focus on. And I’m sure the austerity hounds, deficit hawks and stimulus-bashing conservatives will latch onto that 9.5% rate as proof that the unemployment situation is improving, so we can cut back on unemployment insurance and reduce stimulative spending.

But, as I noted earlier, the decline in the unemployment rate was due to a decline of 652,000 workers from the civilian labor force, and a 0.3% drop in the participation rate to 64.7%. And the reported decline in the number of unemployed workers to 14.6 million was entirely due to the significant increases in the number of those categorized as “marginally attached” and “discouraged” workers. These are all jobless workers who want full-time work but are not counted as unemployed because they either had given up looking or did not look for work in the reporting period.

As Table A shows, June saw an increase of 368,000 in those “marginally attached”, to a total of 2.59 million; and an increase of 124,000 in “discouraged” workers, to a total of 1.2 million. So, even while the regular U-3 unemployment rate declined, the larger U-5 rate, which includes marginally attached and discouraged workers, actually increased to 11.1%.

Overall, there’s really no good news in the jobs report for June. Private employer hiring remains sluggish just as public sector employment is declining. Preliminary figures in today’s employer survey showed significant declines in state and local government employment, particularly in education jobs. State education employment was down 280,000 and local governments lost 352,000 education jobs, according to today’s report.

The positive economic impact of last year’s stimulus is now declining. And more job losses can be expected as states, municipalities and local school districts continue to cut their budgets. Meanwhile, efforts in Congress to spur job growth and provide aid to states as well as to the unemployed, struggling families, youth and older workers all remain stalled by Republican obstruction and the dangerously dumb fixation on fiscal deficits.

Republicans will take this jobs report and shout “the stimulus was a failure” and “government is thwarting growth.” The austerity hounds will chime in, pointing to the reported decline in the unemployment rate as an excuse to inflict more pain.

Anyone who can see straight sees we are in deep trouble — and that there is a clear need for new, large-scale jobs programs, a stronger safety-net, and massive investments to re-employ and re-build America.

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Private Sector Job Growth Sluggish in May

Hopes for a continued strengthening of job growth in the private sector received a setback with the release of today’s employment report from the Labor Department. Private employers, many of whom continue to shed jobs as part of ongoing cost-reduction schemes, were only able to increase their overall employment by a net 41,000 in May. But 31,000 of those jobs were in temporary services, according to the report’s employer survey.

Total employment grew by 431,000 in May, with the addition of 411,000 temporary U.S. government Census workers. State and local governments shed 21,000 jobs last month, reflecting continued severe budget shortfalls caused by recession-induced revenue declines.

The small gain in private employment came after an increase of 218,000 private sector jobs in April and 158,000 in March. The overall unemployment rate declined from 9.9 percent to 9.7 percent, the same rate it was from January through March.

The manufacturing, transportation and warehousing, and health care sectors all posted modest jobs increases. But construction, retail trades and financial services showed net job losses.

The total number of unemployed was little changed at 15 million, a number that has been fairly constant going back to last summer. The .2% decline in the unemployment rate was due to a reported 322,000 drop in the size of the labor force, perhaps an anomaly in the household survey data.

Among the unemployed, the average duration of unemployment increased to 34.4 weeks. Long-term unemployment continued to rise, setting yet another new post-war record. The number of Americans unemployed for 27 weeks or more increased by 47,000 to 6,763,000 — representing 46 percent of all the unemployed. Another troubling statistic emerged in the duration of unemployment data: those unemployed for less than 5 weeks increased by 70,000 workers.

A summary from reactions to today’s report follows:

The Economic Policy Institute:

“These new data do not present a picture of a healthy private sector and offer nothing even closely resembling the job growth we need to dig us out of a very deep hole,” said EPI president Lawrence Mishel.

The vast majority of May’s new jobs (411,000, or 95%) were temporary Census jobs that will disappear over the summer. The private sector saw very modest growth, adding just 41,000 jobs, much slower than the average growth of the previous three months, which was 146,000.

An ongoing concern is the size of the gap in the labor market. To put it in perspective, consider the following: in the boom of the late 1990s, the fastest year of employment growth was 2.6%, in 1998. If, in the event we have that extremely strong level of growth from here on out, we would still not get down to pre-recession unemployment rates until January 2015. The hole in the labor market is staggering, unemployment remains near 10% and long-term unemployment continues to break records.

“Given this uninspiring employment picture, the economic case for substantial additional government action to aid the long-term unemployed and to generate jobs remains overwhelming,” said EPI economist Heidi Shierholz.

Dean Baker at the Center for Economic and Policy Research:

Excluding the temporary Census hires, the economy has generated 132,000 jobs a month over the last three months, just a bit more than the amount needed to keep pace with the growth of the labor force.

This report is a clear warning that the recovery is very weak. The weakness is in spite of the temporary stimulus provided by the hiring of 550,000 Census workers. With house prices falling again, severe state and local budget cutbacks looming, and troubles in Europe dampening exports, the future is not bright.

Meteor Blades at Daily Kos:

Today’s eagerly anticipated jobs report from the Department of Labor fell far short of expectations, once again raising serious questions about the sustainability of the recovery that began in the third quarter of 2009. The total job increase was 431,000, but private-sector hiring hit a disappointing 41,000 jobs, far less than the 180,000 median prediction of 82 experts surveyed by Bloomberg. Some of the experts had predicted as many as 750,000 jobs would be added.

Given that stimulus spending will fade sharply in the third and fourth quarter, it’s now up to the private sector to sustain growth in employment. Experts, including many Fed bank branch presidents, have been saying for months that a tepid economy was in the works.

Meteor Blades added this chart among the comment replies:

2-23-10-1

One thing we can expect is that the Republicans will take glee in the devastating weakness of today’s report. They’re always on the lookout for whatever they can use against the Democrats, even when it means continued misery for millions of Americans. And what do they offer an alternative to current policies? Deficit cuts, more shredding of the safety net, lower taxes for their gated-community pals, obstruction on extending unemployment benefits. Unfortunately, many Democrats have joined the chorus for deficit cutting and knocking big chunks out of measures designed to help the 15 million Americans who are officially out of work.

(That’s the “Dangerous Crossroads” I described here three days ago.)

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Today’s jobs report shows a labor market that has turned the corner and is creating jobs but one with a long way to go toward a full recovery from the devastating job losses of 2008-09. The percentage of the population with a job is generally moving in the right direction but remains at a very depressed level (see chart).

6-4-10ui-stmt-f1

Unemployment is still very high, and jobs are still hard to find.

Under these circumstances, policymakers should have no qualms about passing a robust jobs bill — indeed, they would be derelict not to. Unemployed workers struggling to find a job need the help, and based on current forecasts of relatively weak economic growth for the rest of the year, the economic recovery could really use an additional boost.

The AFL-CIO:

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said the low number of private-sector jobs is further evidence the recovery is still fragile.

“The Economic Recovery Act saved us from a second Great Depression, but it was not sufficient to power strong and sustained job growth, and its effects are expected to wane in coming months.”

He called on Congress to do more to create jobs and sustain the recovery.

“Most immediately, Congress must move quickly to restore health care benefits for the unemployed and provide aid to states to maintain jobs and vital services. We already see state and local governments shedding 22,000 jobs in May. Without further action to offset state budget shortfalls, these job losses will offset temporary gains from federal spending.”

Christina Romer, chair of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers:

Payroll employment rose for the fifth month in a row, and the unemployment rate fell two-tenths of a percentage point to 9.7 percent. While these are encouraging developments, we clearly have a very long way to go until the labor market is fully recovered. It is essential that we continue our efforts to move in the right direction and generate steady, strong job gains and continuing declines in unemployment.

The fact that the unemployment rate fell and private employment rose are obviously encouraging signs that recovery continues. At the same time, the continued high level of unemployment and the slowdown in private sector job growth emphasize the need for continuing vigilance. The Administration strongly supports targeted actions to spur private sector job creation and prevent continued reductions in state and local government employment. Tax incentives for clean energy manufacturing and energy efficiency, extensions of unemployment insurance and other key income support programs, a fund to encourage small business lending, and fiscal relief for state and local governments are essential measures to ensure a more rapid, widespread recovery.

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Jobs Increase But Unemployment Rises

The jobs report for April released this morning by the Labor Department showed the largest monthly gain in employment in four years even as the number of unemployed swelled to 15.3 million and the unemployment rate rose to 9.9%.

Nonfarm payroll employment rose by 290,000 in April, the unemployment rate edged up to 9.9 percent, and the labor force increased sharply, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today.

The household survey data showed:

In April, the number of unemployed persons was 15.3 million, and the unemployment rate edged up to 9.9 percent. The rate had been 9.7 percent for the first 3 months of this year.

Data from the employer survey showed:

In April, nonfarm payroll employment rose by 290,000. Sizable employment gains occurred in manufacturing, professional and business services, health care, and in leisure and hospitality. Federal government employment increased due to the hiring of temporary workers for Census 2010. Since December, nonfarm payroll employment has expanded by 573,000, with 483,000 jobs added in the private sector. The vast majority of job growth occurred during the last 2 months.

Federal government employment was up in April, reflecting the hiring of 66,000 temporary workers for the decennial census.

The household data reported a 550,000 increase in the number of employed persons as well as an increase of 255,000 unemployed. The combined increase of 805,000 in the official labor force was due primarily to more people actively seeking work. But the increase in the number of unemployed to 15.3 million drove the unemployment rate up to 9.9%.

Clearly, there’s some definite progress — but nowhere near enough yet to begin to make up the 11 million jobs deficit caused by the Great Recession.

Here’s a summary of some early reporting on the latest jobs figures:

From The New York Times:

The American economy added an unexpectedly strong 290,000 jobs in April, while the unemployment rate rose to 9.9 percent, the government said Friday.

Analysts had expected a gain of about 190,000 in the month.

With revisions on Friday, April was the fourth consecutive month that the economy added workers (a revised 230,000 jobs were added in March instead of 162,000), the job market still has a long way to go before it can be counted on to provide a base for a sustained economic recovery. More than 15.3 million were unemployed last month.

Besides March, February was revised from a loss of 14,000 jobs to a gain of 39,000. With a January gain of 14,000, the cumulative increase came to 573,000 jobs in four months.

The Times also noted that many people finding work are taking jobs for much less pay than they used to make before becoming unemployed.

Meteor Blades at Daily Kos notes the continuing rise in long-term unemployment:

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported in its seasonally adjusted calculations this morning that some 290,000 new jobs were created in April, far above the consensus of experts surveyed by Bloomberg earlier in the week. Those numbers were made better by the fact that only 66,000 of the new jobs were temporary Census hires, just two-thirds of what was expected. As large numbers of Americans returned to the labor force, the official unemployment rate rose to 9.9%. Some 15.3 million Americans are now officially out of work.

The U6 unemployment rate, an alternative measure that includes underemployed Americans and some who have become too discouraged to look for jobs, rose to 17.1%. The number of long-term unemployed, those without jobs for 27 weeks or more, rose to a new record high of 6.7 million.

The Washington Post noted:

Economists say that in order for substantial, sustainable job growth to occur, the weekly new jobless claims number needs to get down into the low 400,000s or upper 300,000s and stay there. Yesterday, the government reported that 444,000 Americans filed jobless claims last week, the third straight week of declines.

Heidi Shierholz at the Economic Policy Institute reports “Most private sector job growth in four years, but jobless rate rises to 9.9%”:

The increase in employment was not large enough to keep the unemployment rate from rising to 9.9%, as 805,000 workers entered the labor force. The recent surge in the labor force is a partial correction for the labor force decline of the second half of 2009, but there remains a backlog of people waiting to enter or re-enter the labor market in search of work. This will continue to keep the unemployment rate elevated even as jobs are added.
Another ongoing issue is long-term unemployment. The number of people who have been unemployed for more than six months is now 6.7 million and growing. Currently, 45.9% of this country’s 15.3 million unemployed workers have been unemployed for more than half a year.

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